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Chris Noda New Director of Golf at Mauna Lani Golf

Chris Noda Director of Golf at Mauna Lani Golf

Mauna Lani Golf on Hawai’i Island has named Chris Noda as the club’s new director of golf. As director of golf, Noda will lead the golf operations, agronomy, retail and golf-related sales and marketing for Mauna Lani Golf’s two award-winning golf courses.
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Originally from Oregon, Noda has more than 20 years of club operations experience. His Aloha service philosophy and the ability to foster teamwork when working with employees and guests have earned him associate of the month and year awards. Noda holds a degree in public relations from Southern Oregon University and has been a Class “A” member of the PGA of America since 2004.

Managed by Troon® Golf, Mauna Lani Golf’s North and South Courses are masterpieces of design and are stunning examples of what environmentally-sensitive golf course architecture can achieve, with numerous archeological sites, trails, fishponds and ancient Hawaiian petroglyphs preserved throughout the courses. Earlier this year, Mauna Lani’s two courses were honored by Golf Advisor, the leading source for golf course ratings and reviews, as the No. 1 (South) and No.6 (North) courses in Hawaii.

“We are excited to have Chris lead golf operations at Mauna Lani,” said Guy Sugden, vice president operations, Troon Golf. “Chris is very analytical, an outstanding communicator, and will work well with our resort partners at the newly designedMauna Lani, Auberge Resorts Collection, which is set to open in January 2020.”

Noda most recently served as director of revenue management at Kapalua Golf on Maui. While at Kapalua, Noda was responsible for golf revenues from group outings and tournament play on the property’s Plantation and Bay courses.

Mauna Lani’s South Course, a Homer Flint, Raymond Cain and Robin Nelson design, was built on the 16th-century Kaniku lava flow snaking through stark, rugged a’alava. A pair of par 3s – the 7th and 15th holes – are Mauna Lani South’s signature holes and are two of the most photographed golf holes in the world. The South Course was home to the Senior Skins Game from 1990 to 2000 and Golfweek magazine rates it as one of the “Best Courses to Play in Hawai’i.”

Mauna Lani’s North Course, a Flint, Cain and Nelson design, was built on an ancient lava bed and is ranked by Golfweek as one of the top courses on Hawaii. Overlaying the rugged brown pahoehoe lava flow, the North Course features rolling fairways and through kiawe forests. A 230-acre protected archeological district lies on the northern edge of the North Course, while feral goats roam the course, cropping the grass and providing a unique neutral hazard. The par-3 17th is the signature hole on the North Course as a series of elevated tees form a natural amphitheater with the green at the base of a lava bowl.

For more information on Mauna Lani Golf, visit www.MaunaLaniGolf.com or call 808-885-6655.

About Mauna Lani Golf

Since opening in 1981, the Mauna Lani golf courses have collected numerous “best courses you can play” awards from GolfweekGolf Digest andGOLF Magazine. Mauna Lani’s award-winning South Course formerly hosted the prestigious Hawaii State Open and was the site of the Senior Skins Game from 1990 to 2000, hosting many of golf’s greats, including Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino, Chi Chi Rodriquez, and Gary Player. The South Course, a Homer Flint, Raymond Cain and Robin Nelson design, was built on the 16th century Kaniku lava flow snaking through stark, rugged a’a lava. A pair of par 3s – the 7th and 15th holes – are Mauna Lani South’s signature holes and are two of the most photographed golf holes in the world. The South Course was home to the Senior Skins Game from 1990 to 2000 and Golfweek magazine rates it as one of the “Best Courses to Play in Hawai’i.” Mauna Lani’s North Course, a Flint, Cain and Nelson design, was built on an ancient lava bed and is ranked by Golfweek as one of the top courses on Hawaii. Overlaying the rugged brown pahoehoe lava flow, the North Course features rolling fairways and through kiawe forests. A 230-acre protected archeological district lies on the northern edge of the North Course, while feral goats roam the course, cropping the grass and providing a unique neutral hazard. The par-3 17th is the signature hole on the North Course as a series of elevated tees form a natural amphitheater with the green at the base of a lava bowl.

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